A Nest for All Seasons A Nest for All Seasons: Progression of a Pea

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22 May 2015

Progression of a Pea

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We all know what a pea seed looks like, right?  Basically a shriveled up PEA!  (see garden peas below).  Snow peas are slightly different with a smoother, whiter appearance (see below) and sweet peas are a surprise with their dark, almost black coloring (not pictured).

The Difference Between Snow Peas, Sweet Peas and Garden Peas by Amy Renea at A Nest for All Seasons

However, when the three types of peas start to grow, they look very much alike and grow in similar fashion.  Garden peas have more lateral growth and the tendrils reach out horizontally, while the sweet pea has more of a vertical growth at first.  Both are easy to recognize from weeds thanks to the little grasping tendrils that help them climb.  They show up very early after the first true set of leaves.

The Difference Between Snow Peas, Sweet Peas and Garden Peas by Amy Renea at A Nest for All Seasons

The Difference Between Snow Peas, Sweet Peas and Garden Peas by Amy Renea at A Nest for All Seasons

As they grow larger, pea vines (both regular and sweet and everything in between) will twine around and around whatever they can find.  You can use a traditional trellis, or something as simple a string  to guide the pea vine, but in our new garden this year, we have decided upon branches woven into a trellis as pea guides.  While we might have to use small twigs to get the peas going up and around the big lattice pieces, we plan to cover this puppy in beautiful pea vines.

The Difference Between Snow Peas, Sweet Peas and Garden Peas by Amy Renea at A Nest for All Seasons

Note that the box has no bottom, so it serves as a raised bed planter, allowing the pea roots to go deep into the soil.  There was NO garden prep however.  The box went straight over grass and weeds and in went a bunch of compostables (banana peels, coffee grounds), finished compost and then some bagged potting soil.  By the time the roots get down to those bottom layers, they will have had time to die (the weeds) and compost (everything).  SO much easier than till-till-tilling the soil, particularly if you are growing just a little bit!

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