A Nest for All Seasons A Nest for All Seasons: Roasted Butternut Squash with Fresh Ginger

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18 January 2012

Roasted Butternut Squash with Fresh Ginger

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So Monday I told you all up and down about how wonderful Nicole's soup is right?  Did you try it?  Well, as you remember, I was eating the soup for lunch and dinner for like a week, so that is a lot of cooking squash...which also means a lotta lotta peeling and gutting squash.  A lotta lotta.  Now for those of you not familiar with peeling and gutting squash...let me give you a brief lesson.

You have to cut off the top of the squash, then cut of the bottom.  Then you have to start peeling the thing.  From the top in little strips, around the whole top of the squash.  Don't peel your fingers in the process!

Then you get to the bottom and it becomes even more difficult to peel.  See how thick that skin is?   
Peeling it is a NOT fun job and if your knife isn't sharp, it becomes quite a dangerous job -- beware!

Once the squash is finally peeled, you cut it in half right down the middle and then scoop out the "guts.  
Messy and not fun, but not nearly as bad as peeling...

Once you get the guts out of the squash, you can toss them in the compost or separate the seeds from the pulp and roast the seeds...nom nom!

In Nicole's recipe, this is the point where you cut the squash into cubes, roast and then puree the squash.  To be honest, the peeling, gutting and cubing was taking forever, so on my second batch I decided to roast the squash in its skin.  From what I have read the skin has a bunch of nutrients in it, and I'm thinking they probably leech into the flesh while roasting...that's just a theory though - don't quote me.  The fact of the matter however, is that leaving the skin on while roasting is MUCH much easier.  I did two batches and taste tested them to make sure that the taste didn't suffer, and I couldn't tell the difference between the two!  So from now on, my squash soup is going to be roasted whole like this:

Do you see how the skin just crisps around the top?  
Once the squash is roasted simply use a spoon and scoop out the flesh as close to the skin as possible.

What about the ginger??
Simply add your peeled and chunked ginger (no getting around the ginger peeling) and a little salt and pepper
into the "guts" cavity and sprinkle the whole squash with kosher salt and pepper.

YUM.  Eat up!


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