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26 January 2012

How to Plant Ginger Root

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So hey....apparently planting a pineapple top as a hosue plant is big news...everyone's all pinning and asking questions about growing your own pineapple and gaining a cheap new houseplant, so I thought I would show you another one of my pantry planting successes.  Ready for some NEW houseplants??

I've been on a major ginger kick lately, so a few months ago, I planted a few chunks of ginger to multiply my supply.  Now, people are going to get on my case because you are supposed to lay the ginger on top of the soil, but I plant it right under the surface so my babies don't steal it and eat it.  (Yes, they literally do things like that if plants aren't rooted down yet...no foxglove for THIS family!)  I have had no issues growing ginger this way!!

So here's a chunk of ginger root, about an inch long, unpeeled....

[ Thanks to Andrea for  mentioning in the comment section to be careful to make sure there is a "node" on each section you plant.  All of the important "stuff" to grow is hidden in that node and without one, the ginger will just rot.  You can kind of think of it as the "seed" inside the little piece of ginger.  A node (or bud or whatever you want to call it) is just a little knob on the ginger...you are probably more familiar with potatoes.  You know when potatoes sprout in your pantry?  That little sprout came from a node.  (See a photo HERE)  Try to find those little bumps on your ginger.  If all else fails, try taking an inch off the end of each little "finger" -- those almost always have a node on them!]







Simply place your chunk of ginger in a pot of rich potting soil and DON'T OVERWATER.  
A few cubes of ice a week work until the leaves start to show up.

Bye-bye ginger!


Fast forward a few months...hello little ginger poking up through the soil (see those two little guys?!)


If you enjoyed this post, I would ask one small thing of you.  
I have the honor of being one of five garden bloggers Better Homes and Gardens is considering as their premiere garden blogger.  

Would you please help me by voting?



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13 COMMENTS:

Torviewtoronto Thursday, January 26, 2012  

will try thanks for sharing

Kelly Jo Thursday, January 26, 2012  

awesome! I am going to do this for sure! I enjoy adding ginger to my juices and it would be great to grow rather than buy! Oh, and I'm pinning :)

loves2spin Thursday, January 26, 2012  

Thank you for this. How nice!

Laura Thursday, January 26, 2012  

You're an internet sensation! I love it. I've not planted anything from my pantry and most likely won't. But it's fun to see your successes!

Nessa Bixler Thursday, January 26, 2012  

Seriously!?! How fun.

Andrea Thursday, January 26, 2012  

If the planting material is just one inch, be sure it contains a node, that's where the sprout grows. Planting ginger in pots is really a lovely way of having your own, very handy for instant cooking. I love eating very young immature ginger rhizome. I just slice it very thinly and put lemon and soy sauce or table salt, and it goes very well with whatever friend items; e.g. fish, chicken.

Jamie Friday, January 27, 2012  

This is really cool! I love plants that you can grow from leftover chunks. And ginger is great, we use it all the time in our cooking. Thanks for the tip!

Stop by anytime :) scissorsandsteam.blogspot.com

Rosie Friday, January 27, 2012  

How do you harvest the ginger later? Do you have to rip out the whole plant? I totally want to try this!

Amy Renea Friday, January 27, 2012  

Hi Rosie - You do have to harvest the plant, but typically ginger is planted very shallowly or actually on top of the coil, so it is fairly easy. Simply wash the root and then peel like you would a supermarket version.

Amy Renea Friday, January 27, 2012  

Andrea - Yes! Thanks for mentioning that...I forgot to add it and will insert that {very important} tidbit into the post.

PS everyone...my ginger plant grew like 2 inches in one day yesterday...totally not kidding -- it must like coffee!

Anonymous Wednesday, April 25, 2012  

How about sunlight...Should the pot be in a sourh-facing window, or will just a shady countertop suffice? Rjis will be SO much fun! Thanks.

allenaim photography and design Thursday, April 26, 2012  

Mine is is a south-east facing window by a large tree. In winter (with no leaves on the tree) the ginger got quite a bit of sun, but I think it would still qualify as "partial shade". I am planning on giving it a lot of sun this summer outdoors to get a lot of energy to its roots. I will let you know if too much sun is detrimental!

Anonymous Wednesday, July 11, 2012  

Hey! I would love to see you grow ginseng!

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