How to Grow and Layer Tree Peonies

Layering is one of the most full proof ways to propagate new plants because the new plant is still attached to it's mama while it is putting down roots.  Basically, you take a newish branch close to the bottom of the stem, bend it towards the ground and pile soil on top of the stem so that it can develop new roots.  To make the process go more quickly, you can wound the stem on the bottom where it will come in contact with the soil.    To hold the stem underground where it can stay in contact with the soil, bury the stem and then place a rock or brick on top.   Does this sound like parenthood to anyone else??

Anyway, here is an example of the layering of my newly discovered tree peony.  In the first photo, you can see the mama plant, the rock holding the stem down and the "baby foliage" on the bottom of the frame.  In the second photo, you can see a bit more of the baby plant. 

For some plants, the roots will develop quickly, and others will take a year to grow strong.  Once the baby plant has a good set of roots and is putting on new growth, simply "cut the cord" or the stem back to the mother plant.  You can dig up your new plant, or leave it to grow where it is.  This method works on tons of plants, but I've used it best on shrubs that put out long branches such as hydrangea and forsythia.  One of the best advantages of using this method is that the plant is a larger specimen when it is divided than if you were to start the plant from seed or cuttings.  A layered plant will bloom within a year or two to have flower and after flower of these marvelous beauties:



Comments

sasha said…
Hi there. Stopping by from the Wednesday Hop! Great blog and gorgeous photography. Please stop by my blog Diaper Style Memoirs and check it out. Enter the amazing Honeycup Giveaway while you're there.

Have a great day!
Inessa
Diaper Style Memoirs

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