A Nest for All Seasons A Nest for All Seasons: A Weed Dictionary for Beginners | Spring Edition

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15 April 2011

A Weed Dictionary for Beginners | Spring Edition

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I was going to take photos of all the {beautiful} flowers blooming in my yard for GARDEN BLOGGERS BLOOM DAY, because there are a host of gorgeous daffodils, crocus, tulips and all manner of buds.  However, there is a larger host of the perennials friends we call weeds.  So, on today's bloom day, I'm sharing a few baby weeds instead as my first of several posts on identifying the little suckers.

When I took my first gardening baby steps, one of things that confused me most was what plants looked like when they were babies, and emerging from the ground in spring.  Whenever I would look up a plant online, it was usually flowering, and at the very least, it was full grown.  I had no idea whether seedlings were weeds or plants, and it was frustrating.  I'm starting a guide of baby plants in hopes that someone will have a little less frustrating journey as they begin to garden!

The first set of plants are the most common and tough weeds in my garden.  The first is Queen Anne's Lace.  Although it is pretty when it is blooming, this plant is taking over a lot of my flower beds.  I had to rip out tons and tons and tons of the stuff last summer and the stems made my arms itch, so I would prefer to get them while they are babies like this:


If you happen to really love the flowers of Queen Anne, no worries.  You will not be able to get rid of all of them, 
so you are almost guaranteed a few blooms even if you think you did a thorough job of weeding.

The next weed is a classic, and while I don't mind a few in the lawn, they bug me in the flower bed.  
Thanks to the huge, long tap root, dandelions are hard to get rid of.  
The very best thing you can do is teach your little boys that those sweet yellow flowers are the best flowers to pick for their mommy :)

Next is a plant that I really don't mind unless it gets into the strawberry patch.  
It is false strawberry.  Easy to rip out, no poison, little red fruits. 
It doesn't really bug me too much, but if you want to get rid of it, it looks like this when it is a baby!

It does have a long root, but they come out quite easily after a rain (unlike its fellow weed, the dandelion).

This final weed is a bully.  Quackgrass spreads wide and is super tough.  I try to rip it out whenever I see it.

Next up are the really big guns...poison ivy, pokeweed and more!

This post brought to you by Flower Angel Nursery
Free seeds with every purchase!


Rebecca Friday, April 15, 2011  

Love your photos (they almost make weeds look attractive!)...

Lydia Friday, April 15, 2011  

My mother tricked me into weeding for her. She told me I had my very own weed patch. I could gather from wherever I wanted in the garden. But my "garden" never took root.

allenaim photography and design Saturday, April 16, 2011  

Thanks Rebecca! :)

Lydia, I am TOTALLY stealing your mom's idea - brilliant!!! :)

Sweet Little Smoothie Monday, April 18, 2011  

I agree with Rebecca - those pictures DO make those weeds look almost pretty! I'm loving your gardening posts! I'm your newest follower :)

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